For Online or Face-to-face Individual, Couple, or Family Counselling, Treatment of Diagnosed Depression/Anxiety and

other Conditions,

and/or Prayer/Spiritual Support with

Owen Robinson

MAASW (Adv. Accr) MACSW Clinical Div

BSW (Curtin) MA (Counselling)

BEd (Science) Grad. Dip. Management


Counsellor, Medicare Provider and Training Consultant

Senior Consultant for Converge International

Veterans & Veterans Families Counselling Service Provider

Department of Veterans Affairs Provider

Insurance Commission of WA Provider

Listed as a Blue Knot Foundation Trauma-informed Service



For info Phone: 0408 890 887

(please allow one day for replies to messages)


NB Medicare rebates are available if you see a GP for a mental healthcare plan







AMPM Doctors

cnr High Road and Granville Way, Willetton

Willetton

Western Australia  6155

Medicare Provider 442250BY

Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays 7:45am-4:00pm

For Appointments Phone/SMS 0408 890 887






Stirk Medical Group

113 Edney Road

High Wycombe

Western Australia  6057

Medicare Provider 4422503H

Tuesdays 8:30am-5pm

For Appointments Phone 9454 4431






Stirk Medical Group

32 Newburn Road

High Wycombe

Western Australia  6057

Medicare Provider 4422502X

Thursdays 8:30am-5pm

For Appointments Phone 9454 5233










To mail: PO Box 260

Maddington

WA 6989


To email: morehope@iinet.net.au







This is NOT an emergency service.  For Western Australian mental health emergencies please contact the Mental Health Emergency Response Line on 1300 555 788


or


attend the nearest Emergency Department of a hospital.


Alternatively contact Lifeline on

13 11 14.



Other support services:


Kids Helpline: 1800 55 1800 - for 24/7 telephone counselling for young people 5-25 years


Suicide Callback Service: 1300 659 467 - for 24/7 telephone crisis support for people at-risk of suicide, carers and bereaved


MensLine Australia: 1300 78 99 78 - for 24/7 telephone and online support, information and referral services for men


Beyond Blue: 1300 22 4636 - for 24/7 telephone support and online chat 4pm - 10pm (AEST)


Meth Helpline :  1800 874 878 - The Meth Helpline is a free confidential telephone counselling, information and referral service for anyone concerned about their own or another person's meth use.



1800RESPECT - 1800 737 732 - 24 hour 7 days a week, confidential telephone and online support - 1800RESPECT is not only a support service for people affected by sexual assault, domestic and family violence. It is also an information and support service for family, friends, and frontline workers.





Acknowledgement of sources of graphics used on this web site:



Permission given on 27 Nov 2016 by Danny Silk for #KYLO (Keep Your Love On) and lovingonpurpose.com;


Permission given on 27 Nov 2016 by Kris Vallotton for #KVM (Kris Vallotton Ministries).


EverWeb public domain images


Brett Jones Online Free Stock Photos: http://brentjonesonline.com/blog/blogging/where-to-find-free-stock-photos/


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Counsellor is sometimes misspelled as counselor, councelor, councellor or councillor and Counselling is sometimes spelled as counselin.,  

Suburbs serviced include Shelley, Rossmoyne, Willetton, Parkwood, Ferndale, Bull Creek, Lynwood, Wilson, Cannington, Canning Vale, Leeming, Salter Point, Waterford, Karawara, Brentwood, Murdoch, Welshpool, Huntingdale, Victoria Park, Gosnells, Martin, Piara Waters, Jandakot, Bibra Lake, Cockburn Central, South Perth, Melville, Samson, North Lake, Myaree, Alfred Cove, Rivervale, Burswood,Orange Grove, Belmont, Ascot, South Guildford, Guildford, Hazelmere, Woodbridge, Midvale, Swan View, Greenmount, Helena Valley,Maida Vale, Gooseberry Hill, Kalamunda, Lesmurdie, Walliston, Carmel, Bickley, Forrestfield, O'Connor  Individual counselling anger management counselling marriage counselling couple counselling child counselling parenting counselling sexual abuse counselling, self-harma nd suicide counselling trauma counselling relationship counselling stress management Self esteem and personal development adolescent counselling  















More Hope                More Calm              Get on Better

ABN 80 483 081 209

Thinking Distortions:


Adapted from:  https://psychcentral.com/lib/15-common-cognitive-distortions



Thinking distortions are simply ways that our mind convinces us of something that isn’t really true.


These inaccurate thoughts are usually used to reinforce negative thinking or emotions — telling ourselves things that sound rational and accurate, but really only serve to keep us feeling bad about ourselves.


1. Filtering.

We take the negative details and magnify them while filtering out all positive aspects of a situation. For instance, a person may pick out a single, unpleasant detail and dwell on it exclusively so that their vision of reality becomes darkened or distorted.


2. Polarized Thinking (or “Black and White” Thinking).

In polarized thinking, things are either “black-or-white.” We have to be perfect or we’re a failure — there is no middle ground. You place people or situations in “either/or” categories, with no shades of gray or allowing for the complexity of most people and situations. If your performance falls short of perfect, you see yourself as a total failure.


3. Overgeneralization.

In this cognitive distortion, we come to a general conclusion based on a single incident or a single piece of evidence. If something bad happens only once, we expect it to happen over and over again. A person may see a single, unpleasant event as part of a never-ending pattern of defeat: e.g. a single powerless experience that turns into a belief that "I am always powerless."


4. Jumping to Conclusions (e.g. assuming we know; 'mind-reading').

Without individuals saying so, we know what they are feeling and why they act the way they do. In particular, we are able to determine how people are feeling toward us.  For example, a person may conclude that someone is reacting negatively toward them but doesn’t actually bother to find out if they are correct.  Another example is a person may anticipate that things will turn out badly, and will feel convinced that their prediction is already an established fact.


5. Catastrophizing.

We expect disaster to strike, no matter what. This is also referred to as “magnifying or minimizing.” We hear about a problem and use what if questions (e.g., “What if tragedy strikes?” “What if it happens to me?”).

For example, a person might exaggerate the importance of insignificant events (such as their mistake, or someone else’s achievement). Or they may inappropriately shrink the magnitude of some things until they appear tiny (for example, a person’s own desirable qualities or someone else’s imperfections).


6. Personalisation.

Personalisation is a distortion where a person believes that everything others do or say is some kind of direct, personal reaction to the person. We also compare ourselves to others trying to determine who is smarter, better looking, etc.  A person engaging in personalization may also see themselves as the cause of some unhealthy external event that they were not responsible for. For example, “We were late to the dinner party and caused the hostess to overcook the meal. If I had only pushed my husband to leave on time, this wouldn’t have happened.”


7. Control Fallacies.

If we feel externally controlled, we see ourselves as helpless a victim of fate. For example, “I can’t help it if the quality of the work is poor, my boss demanded I work overtime on it.” The fallacy of internal control has us assuming responsibility for the pain and happiness of everyone around us. For example, “Why aren’t you happy? Is it because of something I did?”


8. Fallacy of Fairness.

We feel resentful because we think we know what is fair, but other people won’t agree with us. As our parents tell us when we’re growing up and something doesn’t go our way, “Life isn’t always fair.” People who go through life applying a measuring ruler against every situation judging its “fairness” will often feel badly and negative because of it. Because life isn’t “fair” — things will not always work out in your favor, even when you think they should.


9. Blaming.

We hold other people responsible for our pain, or take the other track and blame ourselves for every problem. For example, “Stop making me feel bad about myself!” Nobody can “make” us feel any particular way — only we have control over our own emotions and emotional reactions.


10. Shoulds (e.g. I must, I 'have-to', I ought to, I've gotta ...)

We have a list of ironclad rules about how others and we should behave. People who break the rules make us angry, and we feel guilty when we violate these rules. A person may often believe they are trying to motivate themselves with shoulds and shouldn’ts, as if they have to be punished before they can do anything.  For example, “I really should exercise. I shouldn’t be so lazy.” Musts and oughts are also offenders. The emotional consequence is guilt. When a person directs should statements toward others, they often feel anger, frustration and resentment.


11. Emotional Reasoning.

We believe that what we feel must be true automatically. If we feel stupid and boring, then we must be stupid and boring. You assume that your unhealthy emotions reflect the way things really are — “I feel it, therefore it must be true.”


12. Fallacy of Change.

We expect that other people will change to suit us if we just pressure or cajole them enough. We need to change people because our hopes for happiness seem to depend entirely on them.


13. Global Labeling.

We generalize one or two qualities into a negative global judgment. These are extreme forms of generalizing, and are also referred to as “labeling” and “mislabeling.” Instead of describing an error in context of a specific situation, a person will attach an unhealthy label to themselves.  For example, they may say, “I’m a loser” in a situation where they failed at a specific task. When someone else’s behavior rubs a person the wrong way, they may attach an unhealthy label to him, such as “He’s a real jerk.” Mislabeling involves describing an event with language that is highly coloured and emotionally loaded. For example, instead of saying someone drops her children off at daycare every day, a person who is mislabeling might say that “she abandons her children to strangers.”


14. Always Being Right.

We are continually on trial to prove that our opinions and actions are correct. Being wrong is unthinkable and we will go to any length to demonstrate our rightness. For example, “I don’t care how badly arguing with me makes you feel, I’m going to win this argument no matter what because I’m right.” Being right often is more important than the feelings of others around a person who engages in this cognitive distortion, even loved ones.


15. Earned Reward Fallacy.

We expect our sacrifice and self-denial to pay off, as if someone is keeping score. We feel bitter when the reward doesn’t come.


Fixing Thinking Distortions:


Adapted from: https://psychcentral.com/lib/fixing-cognitive-distortions/


This kind of “stinkin’ thinkin'” can be “undone,” but it takes effort and lots of practice — every day. If you want to stop the irrational thinking, you can start by trying out the exercises below.



1. Identify My Thinking Distortions.  We need to create a list of our troublesome thoughts and examine them later for matches with a list of cognitive distortions. An examination of our cognitive distortions allows us to see which distortions we prefer. Additionally, this process will allow us to think about our problem or predicament in more natural and realistic ways.



2. Examine the Evidence.  A thorough examination of an experience allows us to identify the basis for our distorted thoughts: e.g if we are quite self-critical, then, we could identify a number of experiences and situations where we had success.

3. Double Standard Method.  An alternative to “self-talk” that is harsh and demeaning is to talk to ourselves in the same compassionate and caring way that we would talk with a friend in a similar situation.  We could stop setting a double standard for ourselves.

4. Thinking in Shades of Gray.  Instead of thinking about our problem or predicament in an either-or polarity, evaluate things on a scale of 0-100. When a plan or goal is not fully realized, think about and evaluate the experience as a partial success, again, on a scale of 0-100.



5. Survey Method.  We can seek the opinions of others regarding whether our thoughts and attitudes are realistic. If we believe that our anxiety about an upcoming event is unwarranted, check with a few trusted friends or relatives.



6. Definitions.  What does it mean to define ourselves as “inferior,” “a loser,” “a fool,” or “abnormal.” An examination of these and other global labels likely will reveal that they more closely represent specific behaviors, or an identifiable behavior pattern instead of the total person.



7. Re-attribution.  Often, we automatically blame ourselves for the problems and predicaments we experience. Identify external factors and other individuals that contributed to the problem. Regardless of the degree of responsibility we assume, our energy is better used in the pursuit of resolutions to problems or identifying ways to cope with predicaments.



8. Cost-Benefit Analysis.  It is helpful to list the advantages and disadvantages of feelings, thoughts, or behaviors. A cost-benefit analysis will help us to decide what we are gaining from feeling bad, distorted thinking, and inappropriate behavior.